Privacy rights take another blow as a Federal court dismissed a lawsuit because the judge said that they had no basis to sue.

COURT REJECTS DOMESTIC SPYING SUIT

A federal appeals court has dismissed a lawsuit challenging President Bush’s domestic
spying program, saying the plaintiffs had no standing to sue.

I’ll be honest, I generally don’t like the ACLU because of it’s tendency to jump on anti-Christian cases and try their best to disrupt, complicate or eliminate any activity that’s even a little bit Christian in nature…. but in this case I have to say that the ACLU is actually right.  This domestic spying issue is important, as is the right of citizens to be safe from being wiretapped without some kind of actual court order obtained after somebody shows probable cause and convinces a judge that they have a legitimate case.

U.S. Circuit Judge Julia Smith Gibbons, one of the two Republican appointees who ruled against the plaintiffs, said they failed to show they were subject to the surveillance.

And I wonder, just HOW were they supposed to prove that they were the subject of surveillance?  Those that do such spying don’t keep records anywhere that Joe Public is going to be able to find them if he needs proof he was being spied on.

The court ruling means that if Bush restarts the program, ordinary Americans will have a much harder time challenging it in court. The court ruled that, unless people can prove they’re being eavesdropped on, they will have a hard time suing.

This is almost funny, the talk about “if Bush restarts the program”. …  I have yet to be convinced that it’s ever stopped.  Again, proof one way or the other is not something that’s going to be at all easy to come by… and it’d either be amost obliterated by having “national security sensitive portions” blacked out… or just plain hidden and it’s existance denied to all.

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