Censorship Archives

Freenet 0.5 Is Dead

The anonymous publishing, messaging and file sharing network known as Freenet 0.5 is, in my opinion, finally dead.

I first started using Freenet around 2004 a little while before version 0.5 was released.  It was a great idea, one that I consider to be very important in today’s world where “Big Brother” is increasingly snooping into every aspect of our lives.  A world where privacy is getting harder and harder to achieve and maintain.  A world where the anonymity which is an important part of any free society is more and more difficult to achieve.

It was a platform for truly anonymous publishing and blogging that was completely proof against censorship.  You could write anything you wanted and as long as you were careful not to expose details that could identify you, it guaranteed bulletproof anonymity that few (if any) other networks could achieve.

When I finally had a computer with enough capability and an internet connection that could handle the load, I started a permanent Freenet node of my own.  Except for occasional technical or hardware difficulties that node ran 24/7 for well over six years.  I maintained a “Flog” (a Freenet blog) and an index site that used a spider program to search out and maintain a list of links to other Freenet sites.

Then a few years ago the Freenet developers decided that it was time to move from version 0.5 to version 0.7.  A lot of people welcomed this change and migrated to the new version right away.  A lot of other people had an assortment of reasons not to trust the new version and stayed with 0.5.

For several years the two networks, while not compatible, existed side by side.  Many people ran both versions simultaneously, maintaining a presence on both networks.

Sometime around 2010 I began to notice an increasing decline in the number of 0.5 nodes that my node knew about.  Identities on the Frost message boards that I had been acquainted with for years began to go silent.  Never to be heard from again.

It reached the point where the only message boards I could find with activity on them were the ones related to file transfers, used to request files to be inserted into the network and report successful and unsuccessful downloads.

Around 2010 I began trying to convince people that if this 0.5 network were to survive it would need fresh new content.  It would need people to create new Freesites and Flogs and make at least semi-regular updates of those sites.

Eventually I took what I considered a drastic measure.  I obtained copies of the Freenet 0.5 and Frost source code and began learning Java in the little bit of spare time I had in an effort to get development restarted.  I began work on updating Freenet and even published build 5110, the first new build in over two years.  For well over a year I asked Freenet users for any help in this project that they were willing to offer.

In all that time I received all of a mere handful of one time responses.  Attempts to follow up on those responses received absolutely zero followup replies.

Fast forward to today.  In the last five months my node has NEVER been connected to more than one other at a time and that has always been the same node.

I hung in there hoping even then that things would turn around.

They have not.

Two nodes do not make even a fiftieth of a useful anonymous network.  In fact, with only two nodes (at least that I am aware of), anonymity is impossible.

Therefore I have taken it upon myself to declare that based on my observations over the last six months that Freenet 0.5 is dead.

I have shut my node down and will probably not start it back up again.

I know that there will be some who will say that I should just move to the 0.7.x branch of Freenet however at this time I still cannot bring myself to trust it because it’s so-called “darknet” is built on the concept of trusting node operators that you have no real-world reason to trust.  You don’t know them, in the overwhelming majority of cases you’ve never even met them or had any kind of online interaction with them before encountering them on the anonymous network.

Freenet 0.5 may have been left behind in terms of technology but I still think that it has one clear advantage over the current version.  It does not and never has required you to trust another node operator.  In fact it assumes that at any given time there are evil operators attempting to compromise individual users or even the network itself.

In my opinion, an anonymous network cannot rely on a trust based system.  Instead it must assume that there are large numbers of operators, either individually or working together, that are trying to compromise the network and it’s users.  The “darknet” that Freenet’s developers have created does not do this.

Oh I will probably look over and try out the current official version of Freenet from time to time but I’ve got to say.  It just won’t be the same.  By making that split and not maintaining network compatibility with the 0.5 branch, the developers divided Freenet and it’s users in a way that caused a lot of hard feelings and even more distrust.

For quite a while the divisiveness I saw between the two different versions was reminiscent of stories I’ve read about the US Civil war.  It started in 1861 and now, well over a hundred and fifty years later there are still people who are angry about it and distrustful of the descendents of the other side.

In any event.  With the death of Freenet 0.5 anonymity and freedom of speech have been wounded at least a little bit in a time when they are taking enough wounds from big government, big content, big corporations and politicians with their nasty little agendas.

Nice going fellas.

Your Freedom Online

I know that in recent weeks I haven’t had much to say here about the SOPA and PIPA bills in Congress and I really should have.  Suffice it to say that there’s been a lot of complications that have kept me busy with things of a more personal nature.

However that doesn’t change the fact that either of these bills will have devastating effects on the freedom of speech that most of us currently take for granted.

They cannot be allowed to pass in any form.  Copyright infringement is a serious issue however that does not mean that it’s ok to allow Congress to, at the behest of “Big Content”, turn the internet into something that will eventually be just another part of their big money machine.  One that will allow little to no rights for the individual.

Both of those bills were crafted by the entertainment industry and essentially give them free reign over control of content.  They would stifle creativity and innovation and would also severely curtail the ability of people to express themselves online.

I strongly recommend that everybody contact their congresscritters and let them know that you want them to oppose any legislation that gives “Big Content” such a free pass to destroy the internet as we know it.  The easiest way I know to do this is to go to Http://eff.org and check their “Action Alert” page.  There you will find links that make it easy to contact your senators and representatives and make your voice heard.

The more people speak out the better.  We need to raise enough voices that they are convinced to not pass either of these bills or any future bills like them.  I’ve done so myself and I encourage everybody else to do so as well.

If we don’t speak out against it we’ll only have ourselves to blame if these bills pass.

Technorati Tags: freedom of speech, big content, entertainment industry, freedom of speech online, piracy, freedom, pipa, sopa, internet, copyright infringement, copyright

Am I Fighting A Losing Battle?

I’ve been running a Freenet node for a long time.  When I first started it up Freenet was at 0.4.  A couple of months later it was at version 0.5 and some time after that I was able to run my node 24/7 most of the time.

With the exception of occasional downtime due to technical (hardware) difficulties it has now been running 24/7 for no less than six years.

Some time ago, because nobody else was doing anything with it I decided that I would try to take on development in an effort to get the network built up and growing again.

In the last several months I’ve spent as much time as I could trying to figure out the source code and work on it.  In the last two years or more I’ve tried to convince people to use the network. I’ve spent a lot of time trying to get people to actually use the Frost message boards and to create and update freesites.

The reward for my efforts has been large doses of silence with occasional comments by people whose only use for Freenet has been to complain about how it’s dying.

The problem is that if those people would take the same energy and time that they use for those complaints and expressions of apathy and use them to create new content on Freenet and promote the network, I firmly believe that it would have thousands of active users now instead of the low number of die-hards like myself.

As I’ve said before, I will continue to keep my node running 24/7 for as long as there is a network to connect to.  However I have to say that the lack of positive response on the part of those still using it is discouraging to say the least.

Is this a losing battle?  I hope not.  I still believe that Freenet 0.5 is important and needs to continue operation.

It’s just that I think it’d be nice to find out that I’m not the only one left trying to keep it going.

http://peculiarplace.com/freenet

Learning Java on my own is not an easy thing.  Learning Java on my own with Freenet as my first project is a monstrous task.  I really wish it didn’t feel like I’m trying to do it alone.

Technorati Tags: anonymity, freenet, frustration, java, development, freedom of speech online, anonymous publishing, internet, freedom of speech, learning java

They Should Have Used Freenet

Wednesday a blogger in Nuevo Laredo that was known on social networking sites only by his nickname – Rascatripas (or Belly Scratcher) became the fourth Mexican blogger since early September to be killed.

According to the news report that I read he helped moderate “En vivo” a site that posts news about shootouts and other illegal activities of the Zetas a narcotics and extortion gang that pretty much controls the city.

His head had been cut off

Why would somebody do this?  The answer to that is in a note that was found with his headless body.

“This happened to me for not understanding that I shouldn’t report on the social networks,”

Simply put, the Zetas were trying to not only shut him up but also to send a message to anyone else that would report on their activities.

In late September another blogger who had also been beheaded was found in the same location.  Earlier that month a man and woman were hung from an overpass.  There was a sign left with them saying that they had been killed because of their activity in social media.

Had they used Fcon they might well all still be alive today.

Using Fcon (freenet classic opennet) they could have posted their information anonymously within the network where it could then have been picked up and re-posted by people operating outside the reach of the Zetas and the corrupt government officials that help them.

so if you’ve ever asked yourself why you should run Fcon, this is one good example.  Had Fcon been large enough and these people had known about it, using it could well have saved their lives and allowed them to continue working to expose the Zetas.

In memory of those murdered for their internet activities trying to expose and stop injustice, Download Fcon and get your node set up today.

Who knows, maybe your doing so will save a life.  Isn’t even the remote possibility of that worth the little bit of effort it takes to set up and run an Fcon node?  I certainly think so.

Technorati Tags: Privacy, blogger killed, mexican drug cartel, install fcon, install guide, Encryption, anonymous publishing, freenet 0.5, install freenet, Anonymity, freedom of speech online, zetas, freenet classic opennet, blogger, fcon, install, anti-censorship, Freenet, blogger beheaded, censorship proof, Censorship, install walkthrough, freedom of speech, Internet

FCON FAQ #1 Why Use FCON Instead of Freenet 0.7.5?

Over the last few years I have seen a number of answers to that question that go in to considerable technical detail but I think that the main reason to use Freenet Classic Opennet (FCON) [which I will refer to as “freenet” or “freenet 0.5”] is a simple trust issue.

You see the current 0.7.5 version is built around the concept of a “darknet”.  In such a darknet your node connects to other nodes that you trust. The problem with this “trust based” connection system is that when it comes right down to brass tacks you have absolutely no reason to trust most if not all operators of other nodes.

It is unlikely in the extreme that you have met any of them or that you ever will.  Even if you do manage to meet even one, it is extremely unlikely that you will spend enough time with them and get to know them well enough to decide they are trustworthy enough to connect to them in 0.7.5’s darknet.

Basing security on trust is all fine and dandy if you have some basis on which to determine an acceptable reason to trust any particular operator but with an anonymous system like freenet there is zero basis on which to determine trust to a degree that is acceptable for such a system.

Freenet 0.5 however doesn’t work that way.  The system does NOT ask you to assume that you can trust any node operator.

It is better to assume that there are “bad guys” using the network that would, given the opportunity, compromise anyone’s anonymity and determine what files a given person is inserting into or requesting from the network.

By not basing any of it’s security on the concept of trusting other node operators Freenet 0.5 has a clear advantage over 0.7.5.

To install Freenet 0.5 simply follow these five easy steps

Once you have it installed it is a very good idea to install Frost which is a text messaging system similar to Usenet that operates within freenet.  Freenet help can be had on the “newbie-help”, “public” and “freenet” boards on Frost.

You can also publish an anonymous website using the Freesite Insertion Wizard that, as long as you are careful not to include identifying information, will be 100% anonymous.  Also, another advantage of publishing on freesites (websites that exist entirely within freenet 0.5) is that you don’t have to pay for hosting or a domain name and you can for the most part make this site as large as you want.  (there’s *some* limitations but you could easily have a freesite that is made up of dozens, even hundreds of pages of text and images.)

Technorati Tags: cannot trust darknet, no reason to trust, anonymous forum, download freent, anonymous publishing, freesite insertion wizard, freenet, anonymous blogging, install freenet, freenet faq, fiw, trust, frost, fcon, darknet, freenet classic opennet, freenet 0.5

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