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UK ISP’s To Get More Into Data Mining

In spite of how things have been going over recent years we have to remember that Here in the “good old U. S. Of A.” is not the only place where freedoms and privacy are under constant attack.  I was again reminded of this when I heard about a recent story on the website of a London television station.

The headline read “‘Black boxes’ to monitor all internet and phone data”

It seems that part of a recent communications data bill ISP’s in the UK will be required to collect all records of communications and store them for at least a year.

There is, in my opinion, considerable doubt about governmental guarantees that the content of messages will not be kept or snooped upon.  Allegedly copies of the header information in emails is what will be saved.

Then there’s the issue of encrypted connections.  These days more and more webmail services use HTTPS (ssl) to encrypt the contents of their pages before sending them.  You would think that this makes it impossible to tell what part of the page is the email, and further which is the header and which the content of the message.

According to the story, ISPs will have to route everything through a government approved “black box” that decrypts the page and sends the decrpted message headers back to the ISP where it gets stored for a year.

They don’t say just exactly what this “black box” is but it sounds to me like part of it is using deep packet inspection, otherwise how will they know that a page contains an email that needs to be decrypted?

Also, if this “Black Box” is so easily able to decrypt SSL encrypted pages then either SSL is now too weak to be considered safe or somewhere there is a backdoor in the system that allows them to decrypt stuff that is not meant for them.

Personally, I suspect both.

This is why more people should learn to encrypt their emails with something like PGP or GnuPG in addition to any encryption that is applied by using https pages.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, “Your privacy is your responsibility”.  If you do not actively work to maintain your privacy then you DO NOT HAVE ANY.

Edward Langenback liked this post

Your Freedom Online

I know that in recent weeks I haven’t had much to say here about the SOPA and PIPA bills in Congress and I really should have.  Suffice it to say that there’s been a lot of complications that have kept me busy with things of a more personal nature.

However that doesn’t change the fact that either of these bills will have devastating effects on the freedom of speech that most of us currently take for granted.

They cannot be allowed to pass in any form.  Copyright infringement is a serious issue however that does not mean that it’s ok to allow Congress to, at the behest of “Big Content”, turn the internet into something that will eventually be just another part of their big money machine.  One that will allow little to no rights for the individual.

Both of those bills were crafted by the entertainment industry and essentially give them free reign over control of content.  They would stifle creativity and innovation and would also severely curtail the ability of people to express themselves online.

I strongly recommend that everybody contact their congresscritters and let them know that you want them to oppose any legislation that gives “Big Content” such a free pass to destroy the internet as we know it.  The easiest way I know to do this is to go to Http://eff.org and check their “Action Alert” page.  There you will find links that make it easy to contact your senators and representatives and make your voice heard.

The more people speak out the better.  We need to raise enough voices that they are convinced to not pass either of these bills or any future bills like them.  I’ve done so myself and I encourage everybody else to do so as well.

If we don’t speak out against it we’ll only have ourselves to blame if these bills pass.

Technorati Tags: pipa, freedom, copyright infringement, big content, piracy, freedom of speech online, sopa, freedom of speech, copyright, internet, entertainment industry

Real Life Slows Things Down

so I’ve been trying to get some much needed re-writing and updating done on my Freenet page (http://peculiarplace.com/freenet).  Things like bring instructions up to date, replace old screenshots on the Frost page with new ones taken from the current version of Frost…finish the new page for the Freesite Insertion Wizard and more.

The problem is that this imaginary thing called “real life” (imagine that) keeps interfering with my efforts to get things done.  As a result progress is slower than I would like.  However there has been some progress so keep an eye on those pages over this next week.  I am hoping to have most of those three pages done by then and get some work done on some more freenet stuff as well.

Technorati Tags: anonymous publishing, freenet, anonymity, argh, delays, anti-censorship, freedom of speech

Having recently announced the release of build 5110, the first new build of Freenet Classic Opennet (FCon) in well over two years it has occurred to me that it would be a good idea to put together a brief walkthrough of the installation process.

Because I’m a windows user and have never installed it on a Linux machine these directions are specifically for windows.  When I am able to I’ll do another walkthrough for Linux.

Freenet’s hardware requirements are, in modern terms, pretty mild.

Minimum:

400MHz Pentium 2, with at least 192MB of RAM.

Recommended:
1GHz or more processor with 256MB RAM or more.

As you can see most modern computers will far exeed these requirements.

*Note*

Back around 2004 I actually managed to run freenet on a 200mhz Pentium with only 64mb of ram running Windows 98.  It was very slow and sluggish but it worked enough to view freesites or use FIW to insert new editions of freesites

On my laptop with a 2.1ghz cpu and 2gb of ram I am able to run Freenet while running cpu intensive tasks like rendering high definition video and neither process will suffer any noticeable performance drop at all.

These steps should work the same on Windows 98, xp, and seven.  Windows Vista will probably be more of a pain but I don’t have a vista machine to test on.

1 get or already have Java JRE 7 from http://java.sun.com/javase/downloads/index.jsp

2 download the distribution archive at this url:

http://peculiarplace.com/freenet/downloads/freenet-0.5-build-5110.zip

and extract the archive to c:\freenet (or whatever directory you want.  I’m using c:\freenet for this example.)

3 use a plain text editor like notepad to edit flaunch.ini change the JavaExec= and Javaw= lines to point to where java.exe and javaw.exe are located. If you used the default install they will probably be in C:\Program Files\Java\jre1.7\bin\

4 edit freenet.ini

*note* remove the % from the beginning of any line you edit or freenet will ignore the change

You only need to edit these entries:

ipaddress=

If freenet cannot determine your IP address by itself, you will need to set it here.

listenport=

the port number that freenet will use to listen for incoming connections from other freenet nodes. You can change this to any number you like as long as it’s higher than 1024 and lower than 65535.  Do not use the same port number as another application

storeSize=

The size of the local data store.  The more space you allocate here the better.  It defaults to one gigabyte (1G) however you can increase this to however much space you can spare.

At this point you can save freenet.ini and close the editor.  It’s very likely that you could never need to edit this file again.

4-a make sure that incoming TCP traffic on listenport is forwarded to the computer freenet is running on (see your router or firewall docs for how to do this)

4-b optional (but very convenient), get a http://dyn.com/dns/dyndns-free/ domain name & use dynupdate to keep it pointed at your IP address, then put that name in ipaddress in freenet.ini

5 create a shortcut to “freenet.exe” and put it on your desktop, program menu or if you want freenet to start when the computer boots, put the shortcut in the “StartUp” entry of the program menu.

Double click on the freenet.exe shortcut to start freenet.  When Freenet starts, you’ll see the blue rabbit icon in your system tray by the clock.  Right-Click on it to start and stop Freenet.

To open the Freenet web interface you can either double click on the rabbit icon in the system tray, right click and select “open gateway” or just type http://127.0.0.1:8888 into your web browser.

*NOTE* The “Configure” option on that right click menu will try to run a utility called “Nodeconfig.exe” You are infinitely better off to simply stop freenet temporarily and edit freenet.ini yourself instead.  In most cases editing that file will be a VERY rare need.  Once Freenet is working you may well never need to edit it.

Because in my experience the “Nodeconfig.exe” utility has caused more problems than it’s worth by overwriting perfectly good freenet.ini files when all I wanted to do was tweak a setting I have elected not to include it in this distribution.

As a result, clicking “configure” will result in an error message because the program isn’t there.  Just dismiss the error message and use a plain text editor like notepad to edit freenet.ini directly.

Technorati Tags: encryption, install fcon, anti-censorship, install guide, freenet classic opennet, install freenet, anonymity, freenet 0.5, anonymous publishing, install, install walkthrough, freedom of speech online, privacy, censorship proof, censorship, freenet, internet, freedom of speech, fcon

FCon Build 5110 Is Now Available

[Edit June 8, 2012: The Freenet 0.5 network is effectively dead (see this post for details).  While you are welcome to try to make this software work and revitalize it, I know of no currently operating nodes.  If you DO get a useable network up and running, DO let me know.]

A long overdue new build of FCon (Freenet Classic Opennet a.k.a. Freenet 0.5) is now finally available. 

This is largely a maintenance build that should have been done a couple of years ago.  The default bookmarks have been updated and certain links & email addresses have been replaced with new ones.  The old ones pointed to the 0.7.5 fork of freenet which has almost nothing to do with this 0.5 version.

**Note** In order to use this build You will need Java JRE 7, which you can get at this URL:
http://java.sun.com/javase/downloads/index.jsp

If you are new to Freenet (Welcome!) This is the main distribution archive:
freenet-0.5-build-5110.zip

If you are simply upgrading an existing node you will need these two files:

freenet-stable-latest.jar and freenet-ext.jar

The source code for this build is here:

FCon-src-build-5110.zip

Other downloads:

Frost: Bulletin board and filesharing software that serves as the main public text messaging system within freenet.

frost-wot-10-17-2011.zip

It is also included in freenet-0.5-build-5110.zip.  Source code for Frost is located in the “source” sub directory of the frost Directory

If you’re starting up a new node you will need one of these

seednodes.ref

seednodes.ref.zip

seednodes.ref.bz2

They all contain the same data, the .Zip and .bz2 files are compressed to make the download quicker.  Use whichever flavor best suits your setup.

Technorati Tags: anonymous publishing, censorship, internet, freenet classic opennet, freenet, anti-censorship, freenet 0.5, freedom of speech online, update, censorship proof, fcon, privacy, encryption, freedom of speech, anonymity


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